City University of Hong Kong CLASS CLASS
Making Sense of Grammar
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asked Jun 20 in Questions about Chinese Grammar by Ariel (34,470 points) | 24 views

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States are inherently durative; they exist and endure for an indefinite period of time. States lack change; they do not develop during the time that they endure, so they are homogeneous. States may begin or end, they are brought into being or to a close by a change (but change is not a part of state). Because of these characteristics, states are represented by a temporal schema like:

(I) ___________ (F)

The line denotes the period when a state holds. It is not divided into stages. The initial (I) and final (F) points are put in the parentheses, indicating that they are not part of the state itself. In Mandarin Chinese, states are expressed by stative verbs like ‘xiàng’ (resemble), ‘xiāngxìn’ (believe), ‘zhīdào’ (know), ‘lǐjiě’ (understand), ‘xīwàng’ (hope), ‘xiǎng’ (want), ‘xǐhuān’ (like), ‘ài’ (love); adjectives also describe states, examples are: ‘hóng’ (red), ‘qíng’ (clear, fine), etc.

[1] Loar, J. K. (2011). Chinese syntactic grammar: functional and conceptual principles. New York: Peter Lang.
answered Jun 20 by Ariel (34,470 points)

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