City University of Hong Kong CLASS CLASS
Making Sense of Grammar
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asked Aug 13 in Questions about Chinese Grammar by Ariel (34,480 points) | 29 views

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First, we have proven that the RVC is like an Accomplishment in that it describes a bounded situation that consists of both a process leading up to the endpoint as well as the endpoint. The perfective aspect views a situation as a complete whole. When it operates on a bounded situation, it refers to the process leading up to the goal and the goal itself. When it operates on an unbounded situation (like the situation described by the Activity verb ‘zǒu’ (walk)), it refers to a process and some arbitrary endpoint. In either case, the situation viewed by the perfective aspect is bounded. Thus, the two domains (the situation named by the RVC and the perfective viewpoint) fit in with the concept of boundedness. This is one reason that the RVC induces the meaning of the perfective aspect.

Second, though the RVC is like an Accomplishment in describing a bounded situation that involves a process and an endpoint, it has its own peculiar feature. The notion of endpoint or goal added by the resultative complement is so intimately bound up with the event that once the process (denoted by V1) is under way, it is understood to lead up to the goal—the resultant state.

[1] Loar, J. K. (2011). Chinese syntactic grammar: functional and conceptual principles. New York: Peter Lang.
answered Aug 13 by Ariel (34,480 points)

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