City University of Hong Kong CLASS CLASS
Making Sense of Grammar
0 like 0 dislike
46 views
asked Aug 15 in Questions about Chinese Grammar by Ariel (34,480 points) | 46 views

1 Answer

0 like 0 dislike
‘hǎo’ (finish): As an adjective, the basic meaning of ‘hǎo’ is ‘good’. As a phase resultative complement, it has the meaning of ‘completing the action denoted by V1’, or ‘have something ready for use’. It is similar but not identical with the meaning of ‘wán’ (finish, complete). Examples are: ‘suàn hǎo zhàng’ (finish reckoning accounts), ‘xiūhǎo chē’ (fix(ed) the car), now the car has recovered its moving ability and is ready to go. More examples are:

改/做/建/准备/洗+好

Gǎi/zuò/jiàn/zhǔnbèi/yùbèi + hǎo

alter, change/do, make/build, construct/prepare + hǎo

finish altering/making/building/preparing/washing

改好文章/做好作业/建好大楼/准备好晚饭/洗好衣服

gǎi hǎo wénzhāng/zuòhǎo zuòyè/jiànhǎo dàlóu/zhǔnbèi hǎo wǎnfàn/xǐ hǎo yīfu

finish revising (the) article/finish doing (the) homework/finish constructing (the) building/finish preparing (the) supper/fiish washing (the) clothes

[1] Loar, J. K. (2011). Chinese syntactic grammar: functional and conceptual principles. New York: Peter Lang.
answered Aug 15 by Ariel (34,480 points)

1,435 questions

1,732 answers

21 comments

12,676 users

1,435 questions
1,732 answers
21 comments
12,676 users