City University of Hong Kong CLASS CLASS
Making Sense of Grammar
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asked Aug 16 in Questions about Chinese Grammar by Ariel (34,480 points) | 41 views

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Manner-of-motion verbs (like: ‘zǒu’ (walk), ‘fēi’ (fly), ‘pǎo’ (run), ‘tiào’ (jump)) and displacement verbs (like: ‘tuī’ (push), ‘ná’ (take), ‘bān’ (move), ‘sòng’ (give), ‘jì’ (mail), ‘rēng’ (throw), etc.)), in collocation with the directional compound complements (DCC), form directional verb compounds (DVC), the DCC indicates the direction of the movement named by a motion or a displacement verb (which will be referred to as V1 from now on) in a physical space. As exemplified by:

跑上来 pǎo shànglái (run up (here)),

跑上去 pǎo shàngqù (run up (there)),

走进来zǒu jìnlái (walk in (here)),

走进去 zǒu jìnqù (walk in (there)),

开回来kāi huílái (drive back (here)),

开回去 kāi huíqù (drive back (there)),

拿过来 ná guòlái ( take over (here) = bring here),

拿过去 ná guòqù (take over (there) = take there),

切开来 qiēkāi lái (cut open),

传开来 chuán kāi lái (disseminate (away)),

升起来 shēng qǐlái (rise (up)), etc.

[1] Loar, J. K. (2011). Chinese syntactic grammar: functional and conceptual principles. New York: Peter Lang.
answered Aug 16 by Ariel (34,480 points)

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